Z: Why vis?

Node: Symbols carry „cultural“ meaning

Descriptor CulturalMeaning
Argumentative standpoint Semiotics
Description

Many symbols are given cultural meaning by tradition (e.g., political or religious symbols) or convention (e.g., road signs). Any use of these symbols in a visualization cannot be independent of these meanings inherited from the broader scope.

Last updated 3 years, 3 months ago (June 22, 2018) by Streeb, Dirk

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Publications (7)

S. M. Kosslyn 1989 Understanding Charts and Graphs 0 1 0 13 0
S. Bertschi and N. Bubenhofer 2005 Linguistic Learning: A New Conceptual Focus in Knowledge Visualization 0 0 1 18 0
S. M. Kosslyn 2006 Graph Design for the Eye and Mind 0 1 0 11 0
C. Ziemkiewicz and R. Kosara 2010 Beyond Bertin: Seeing the Forest despite the Trees 0 0 1 6 0
M. Hegarty 2011 The Cognitive Science of Visual-Spatial Displays: Implications for Design 0 0 1 25 4
A. Gelman and A. Unwin 2013 Infovis and Statistical Graphics: Different Goals, Different Looks 0 0 1 21 2
P. Parsons and K. Sedig 2014 Adjustable Properties of Visual Representations: Improving the Quality of Human-Information Interaction 0 0 1 9 3
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Streeb, Dirk: S. M. Kosslyn [1989]: Understanding Charts and Graphs doi:10.1002/acp.2350030302 - 09.07.20 06:59 (*) Mentioned without valuation One or more paragraphs p. 205 The conventions of a reader’s culture should be obeyed when drawing an effective graphic display.
Streeb, Dirk: S. M. Kosslyn [1989]: Understanding Charts and Graphs doi:10.1002/acp.2350030302 - 09.07.20 06:59 (*) Mentioned without valuation One or more sentences p. 185 These displays necessarily use symbols, which are marks that are interpreted in accordance with convention.
Streeb, Dirk: C. Ziemkiewicz and R. Kosara [2010]: Beyond Bertin: Seeing the Forest despite the Trees doi:doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/MCG.2010.83 - 18.03.18 10:26 (*) Mentioned without valuation One or more sentences p. 7 Such preferences might be learned conventions and in some cases culturally determined, but some are so universal that they suggest the arrangement of data isn’t wholly arbitrary in practice.
Streeb, Dirk: P. Parsons and K. Sedig [2014]: Adjustable Properties of Visual Representations: Improving the Quality of Human-Information Interaction doi:10.1002/asi.23002 - 08.03.18 14:09 (*) Mentioned without valuation One or more sentences p. 464 In addition, color can have very different semantics from one culture to the next.
Streeb, Dirk: S. M. Kosslyn [2006]: Graph Design for the Eye and Mind isbn:978-0-19-531184-6 - 03.03.18 13:12 (*) Mentioned without valuation One or more sentences p. 16 Cultural Conventions. The appearance of a pattern should be compatible with what it symbolizes.
Streeb, Dirk: M. Hegarty [2011]: The Cognitive Science of Visual-Spatial Displays: Implications for Design doi:10.1111/j.1756-8765.2011.01150.x - 02.03.18 13:46 (+) Positive One or more sentences p. 454 It can capitalize on cultural conventions (e.g., higher is better; red signifies danger) so that the mapping between the display and its referent is more transparent.
Streeb, Dirk: A. Gelman and A. Unwin [2013]: Infovis and Statistical Graphics: Different Goals, Different Looks doi:10.1080/10618600.2012.761137 - 27.02.18 16:15 (+) Positive One or more sentences p. 8 In addition, with familiar structures, visual conventions carry some of the work of exposition. Consider, for example, the use of the horizontal axis for a predictor variable and the vertical axis for the outcome
Streeb, Dirk: S. Bertschi and N. Bubenhofer [2005]: Linguistic Learning: A New Conceptual Focus in Knowledge Visualization doi:10.1109/IV.2005.71 - 24.01.18 13:01 (=) Neutral
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